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A blog post by Darris McNeely
Does Israel Matter?

U.S. President Barack Obama recently called on Israel to return to its pre-1967 borders as the basis for a solution to its conflict with the Palestinians. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu countered that this is a non-starter. Why is this such a critical point, and does Israel really matter in the Middle East and to the wider world?

Forty years ago I traveled to Israel to spend the summer working on an archaeological dig at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. When our group arrived we were put to work at the base of the southern wall in the shadow of the Al Aqsa Mosque.

Posted June 13, 2011 | 2 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
A Few Books About Great Deeds

Summer is here and time for another of my recommended book lists. This time I have a theme for my summer reading. It is people who have done great things.

Posted June 9, 2011 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

Unemployment is over 9%. Gas is over $4 and the value of our homes dropped again. No wonder people are concerned about their future and the future of their children. Some are even getting angry. How will we cope?

Posted June 5, 2011 | 1 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
What Have We Learned?

Monday is Memorial Day in America. A day we remember those who have died in service to the country. Flags fly and flowers are placed on graves. Not as many go to the cemeteries as in the past. I guess we are too busy sometimes to pause.

My father, a World War II veteran, would always wear a poppy on Memorial Day. Pressed between the pages of his service Bible was a dried poppy. When I asked him where it came from he said it came from a place called Flanders. He then recited a poem, "In Flanders Fields".

Posted May 27, 2011 | 1 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
Vain Predictions and A Silent Chair

I believe we have had enough talk of predictions of the end of the world for one week. Harold Camping's musings about a rapture and the end of the age and Christ's coming have been the fodder of skeptics and religious hobbyists. Mr. Camping has now moved his end of the world calculations to October 21, 2011. Please, let's end this foolish chatter.

Posted May 26, 2011 | 5 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
Beyond Today: Moving Beyond Tragedy

Our Beyond Today film crew is on the road today to Sugar Creek, Ohio. We have come to interview John and Susan Miller for an upcoming program called, "Moving Beyond Tragedy."

Posted May 24, 2011 | 2 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

By now we have seen the horrendous damage done by Sunday's massive tornado that swept through Joplin, Missouri, killing more than 100 people. As the residents of this southwest Missouri town deal with the damage and loss our hearts go out to them. Tornados are not unusual to this region. But the size and ferocity of this one is unusual, even to an area which is part of the notorius "tornado alley".

Posted May 24, 2011 | 1 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
Harold Camping, False Prophet or True?

Harold Camping has predicted the end will come on May 21, 2011. Is he correct or is he another in a long line of false prophets whose predictions about the end of the world and the coming of Jesus Christ have failed? We'll know by this weekend

The 89 year old Camping is a fundamentalist radio preacher and co-founder of the Family Radio network which broadcasts on several radio stations across the United States. His followers have sponsored billboards across the country and distributed pamphlets from caravans where they proclaim the coming apocalypse.

Posted May 16, 2011 | 3 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
Update on Mississippi River Flooding

The swollen Mississippi River continues moving southward toward New Orleans. It is expected to crest at Vicksburg at levels not seen since the great flood of 1927.

The levees are holding but there now is a danger the river could change its course into the more direct route of the Atchafalaya River. Should this happen a major threat to the port of New Orleans would exist. The Army Corps of Engineers would have to dredge a new canal to return normal water flows to the current Mississippi channel.

Posted May 12, 2011 | 4 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely
Mississippi River Flooding Part of Larger Climate Picture

I grew up in a small Missouri town on the Mississippi River. The stores on Main Street next to the river bore the scars of past floods. That's why I always take note when the mighty river floods.

Posted May 9, 2011 | 0 comments

Latest Comments

Lena VanAusdle said...

@vitdad3absorbant,
Thanks for your comments. There are just a couple of things I'd like to address.

First, you are correct, men are responsible for their own thoughts and actions, which is exactly what this blog says, particularly the paragraph that quotes 2...

fair64 said...

I will be celebrating the Feast of Tabernacles on Jekyll Island, GA this year. This is my 1st "feast of the Lord". I was baptized into the body of Christ through your New York City congregation. I am just beginning to get the idea of just what Jesus may have in store for the world, His Church, and myself by reading Mr....

John-A-Mcguire said...

Excuse me Mr.Victor Kubik,
SEVEN HOLY DAYS...PASSOVER #1 then UNLEAVNED! Am I correct?
Member Australia

John-A-Mcguire said...

Mr. Victor Kibik...My prayers are with you.
Member Australia.

EvanToledo said...

Thanks, Kevin, for bringing up this most IMPORTANT topic!

I struggle with this issue myself. Yes, you are correct that in God's Word, the Bible, there are many narratives that, if graphically portrayed, would not be good entertainment. They were recorded for our learning and admonition upon whom the "end of the ages...

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