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A blog post by Darris McNeely

Posted April 28, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

Britain's elections are May 5 and arguably the most important question, the country's relationship with the European Union is not on the front burner. Europe's future is being debated in France as voters there prepare to vote yes or no on the EU constitution. So in a sense it is premature to speculate about how Britain would vote on the constitution. Prime Minister Tony Blair has promised a referendum sometime after this May, but by then the whole EU constitutional issue could be turned inside out.

Posted April 28, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

A French rejection of the European Union's constitutional treaty would result in the "fall of Europe," Romano Prodi, former president of the European Commission, warned on Sunday.

His words came as the Yes campaign stepped up its increasingly desperate search for a strategy to turn the tide of public opinion ahead of the May 29 vote. In the starkest warning yet of the consequences for the EU if French voters reject the treaty Mr Prodi who was in office when it was drawn up told a French newspaper: "There would be no more Europe. We will pass through a long period of crisis.

Posted April 26, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

There are many predictions on what direction Benedict will take the church. Some say he will carry on in the policies and traditions of John Paul II. (But he would need to have the personality and temperament of John Paul II, which he doesn't have. Through no fault of his own, Benedict is a less attractive personality.) Analysts also point to his choice of a name, for Benedict, which means "blessing" and may indicate that he sees himself following in the tradition of Benedict XV, who attempted to pour oil on the pre-World War I tensions.

Posted April 20, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

Posted April 20, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

This week the world waits to see whom the next pope will be. As I write the 115 Cardinals who will elect the new pontiff have been sealed in the Sistine Chapel at Vatican City. When they emerge a new pope will be in place.

Posted April 19, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

A conservative pope

Tuesday, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany was chosen to become the 265th pope.
By Peter Ford and Sophie Arie

VATICAN CITY - Roman Catholics around the world reacted with a mixture of shock and joy to the announcement Tuesday evening that Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, one of the most conservative and doctrinally orthodox of the church's cardinals, had been elected as the next pope.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0420/p01s04-wogi.html


Posted April 19, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

While watching NBC's coverage at the Vatican today they were interviewing papal biographer George Weigle. His first observation upon the announcement of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI was two fold. First he is a humble pious man who spent much of his early priesthood as a scholar and professor. Ratzinger drafted some key documents during the meetings of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council.

Posted April 19, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

Much speculation has centered on a possible pope from a developing nation such as Africa or latin America. Along with Asia, these regions represent the areas of growth for the Catholic Church. While this could happen it is interesting to consider these thoughts by Tony Barber in today's Financial Times.

Posted April 18, 2005 | 0 comments
A blog post by Darris McNeely

Russia was this year's partner nation for the world's largest trade fair, the Hanover trade fair, which ended last week. Russian President Vladimir Putin accompanied German chancellor Gerhard Schr

Posted April 18, 2005 | 0 comments

Latest Comments

EvanToledo said...

Thanks, Kevin, for bringing up this most IMPORTANT topic!

I struggle with this issue myself. Yes, you are correct that in God's Word, the Bible, there are many narratives that, if graphically portrayed, would not be good entertainment. They were recorded for our learning and admonition upon whom the "end of the ages...

Ahumble1 said...

Thank you, Steven. I have experience a valuable 'aha moment' as I read your words.
For myself, every word hit the target providing truthful, profitable insight.
Again thanks tor sharing.

Jacob Hitsman said...

Good job Kevin!

We do live in a violent world and as I like to say to people put a filter on your mind and do not let all matter of information enter it. Factual information is something different because we should know and understand the times we are living in. The war in Syria and Iraq and the diseases such as...

kimandtroy said...

Excellent, I totally agree!! There is so much filth, violence and sex on tv that we do not pay for it. Our only entertainment is what we put in the dvd player and I always ask myself 'is this something I would still watch if Jesus was sitting next to me'? I hope many read this and think about what they are putting into...

Janet Treadway said...

Hi Linda, I have also had that happened to me. When I am thinking of something or concerned about something, or discouraged, I can open up my Bible and there is exactly the scripture that I need. It is like God reaching down and talking to me through His word. How wonderful God is that He works with us, and the tool of...

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